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the band Jynx

M, #8354, b. 1967
Last Edited: 29 Mar 2020
Jynx drum skin c1968
Jynx business card giving agent/manager's details c1969
  • (Child) Birth*: The band Jynx was born in 1967.
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig in 1968 at Invercarse Hotel, Perth Road, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .1
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx had a publicity photo taken in May 1969 at Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .1
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig in May 1969 at Town Hall, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx had a publicity photo taken in September 1969 at Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .1
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 9 January 1970 at Maud, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 10 January 1970 at Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 11 January 1970 at Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 17 January 1970 at MacDuff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 23 January 1970 at Mintlaw, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 24 January 1970 at Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 6 February 1970 at Banff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 7 February 1970 at MacDuff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 20 February 1970 at Menzieshill, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 21 February 1970 at Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 27 February 1970 at Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 28 February 1970 at MacDuff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx had a publicity photo taken in March 1970 at Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .1
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 6 March 1970 at Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 7 March 1970 at Beach Ballroom, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx went to the Nice concert on 14 March 1970 at Caird Hall, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 15 March 1970 at St Joseph's Halls, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 20 March 1970 at Laurencekirk, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 21 March 1970 at Ellon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 2 April 1970 at Menzieshill, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 3 April 1970 at Maud, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 4 April 1970 at Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 9 April 1970 at audition at Casablanca Club, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 10 April 1970 at Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 11 April 1970 at Beach Ballroom, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 12 April 1970 at Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 17 April 1970 at Strathclyde University, Maryland, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 24 April 1970 at Pretorcher, Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 25 April 1970 at St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 2 May 1970 at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 8 May 1970 at Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 10 May 1970 at HMS Condor, Arbroath, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 23 May 1970 at US Naval Base, Dunoon, Argyleshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 29 May 1970 at Mintlaw, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 30 May 1970 at Grange, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 31 May 1970 at Lossiemouth, Morayshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig in June 1970 at Hubara, Broughty Ferry Road, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 13 June 1970 at US Naval Base, Edzell, Angus, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 19 June 1970 at Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 20 June 1970 at Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 26 June 1970 at Fordoun, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 27 June 1970 at Castle Douglas, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, .2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig on 28 June 1970 at Carlisle, Cumbria, England, .2
  • Newspaper Article: In July 1970 the band Jynx was featured in a newspaper article in Transplant magazine: Would we possibly have a mention of Dundee's Jynx? They are fanntastic. - Pat, Aberdeen. *see East Coast, page 29, Pat.
    East Coast feature: Do Jynx really exists? Becasue it looks as if we've got a real mystery group among us.
    After sining their praises in this column last month, I decided to investigate the group in detail. A phone call to their agency, and it was fixed up for the group to be present at their offices one afternoon.
    Come the time, with a 50-mile rail journey behind me and my photographer, and what do we find? No group; the agency office locked up, and not a soul in town who'd ever heard of Jynx.
    And to cap it all, a four-hour wait until the next train home ... to think I actually LIKE this job!3
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx played a gig in July 1970 at The New International Club, 127 Princes Street, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, . The New International Club, 127 Princes Street, Edinburgh. tel 031-226 4660. Nash News. Within the last few weeks Groups from different parts of Scotland have been invited to play at the New International Club, 127 Princes Street, Edinburgh.
    It's part of a campaign to discover new talent.
    Several Groups have shown good qualities. Noted this month, has been, the Sudden Life from Dundee.
    Two Main Halls in the "Nash" are being used for the most popular kind of music, therefore a minor hall will be in operation to test the demand of other types of other entertainement. Just n ow the choice has been for Country and Western which is becoming popular again.
    The Nashville Three will have a try - Best of Luck.
    Just now amongsth the Edinburgh Groups, the Rockin' Chair are increasing their popularity for their good wuality of music.
    Forthcoming engagements at the "Nash" for the first time are:
    Beggars Opera
    Colour Blind
    Ceremony
    Jynx
    Copper Plate Movement
    Staircase
    Suede
    Small World
    of course!
    Mike Riley married on 27th June - that combination should make the charts!2
  • Event-Misc: The band Jynx won a competition in August 1970 at British Legion Hall, Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, . Courier & Advertiser August 1970 reports: First Fraserburgh pop festival a smash hit. Organisoers of Fraserburgh's first Pop Festival yesterday praised the young people pf the town for making a the week-long event a great sucess, with a total of £400 being raised for local youth organisations. Four groups sompeted for the festival's £100 prize at the British Legion Hall on Saturday night, when more than 700 people attended.
    And it was a Dundee outfit, The Jynx, who carried of the honours - and the cheque - with a resounding performance.
    Overwhelmed.
    After their winning session, leader and bass guitarist Eddie Quinn said: "We are overwhelmed. The Standard in the festival was tremendously high, but we are grateful to have the local teenagers right behind us."
    The three other finalists were Aberdeen groups Twighlight Zone and The Royal Teens and Fraserburgh combo Exhibit A.
    Yesterday the energetic Mr George Skinner, a British Legion entertainments official who ran the festival single-handed, paid tribute to the youth of the town.
    Fantastic.
    "This festival has been a fantastic success and it was great to see the youngsters turning up to support it.
    "We had big crowds on each of the four heat nights and of course the final night was unbelievable."
    Mr Skinner has now called upon the town council and all ocal organisations to get their heads together to plan a real bumper summer programme for next year - the idea being mainly to celebrate the jubilee of the British Legion.
    To Discuss Plans.
    "I hope to meet Provost Alex Noble soon to discuss plans for arranging a meeting of all voluntary bodies in the town. We have proved that, properly run, events in Fraserburgh can be very worthwhile," he said.
    Provost Noble was at Saturday night's dance to receive the £400 cheque, which will be divided between the 20 local youth groups who contributed towards the prize money.
    Caption for the photograph: SINGER Fred Houston receives the £100 cheque on behalf of the Jynx from Mr James Sinclair after the group won the town's first pop festival on Saturday night. Looking on are (left to right) Dave Paterson, Eddie Quinn and Bob Carson.

    Evening Telegraph (Aug 1970) reports: Dundee Band Wins £100. JYNX, a Dundee beat band, have won a competition at Fraserburgh - after overcoming a jinx of a different lind.
    The group have been beset by van troubles recently.
    Their own vehicle in presently lying "in dock" at Newcastle.
    They borrowed a van from some friends for the trip to Fraserburgh British Legion Club but got no farther than Brechin where a tyre punctured.
    They telephoned ahead and asked to be put on last of the four beat bands competeing.
    They eventually reached Fraserburgh at 9.45pm.
    The other bands had each played 45 minutes. But after only 25 minutes playing Jynx were told they had won.
    The Jynx line-up is Dave Paterson (organ), Eddie Quinn (bass), Fred Houston (vocals) and Bob Carson (drums).
    Professional.
    They have just turned professional.
    Dave was an upholstererm Eddie a civil servant, Bob and electronic engineer and Fred a ladies' hairdresser - and a s Eddie said as he surveyed the band's flowing locks - "that's quie handy."
    Their prize at the festival was £100.
    The wee-end realised £400 for charity.

    Transplant Magazine (Sept 1970) also reports: East Coast feature: AS if doing a feature on them in this month's magazine wasn't enough JYNX are really proving to me they do exist.
    They won a beat group contest in Fraserburgh by the skin of their teeth, timewise that is, for they ended up 20 points ahead of their nearest rivals!
    Because of the late arrival of their new van they didn't get to the hall where the contest was until 9.45. And they were supposed to be there at six!
    Anyway, they stepped on the stage and when t hey stepped off again they were £100 richer.
    They follow this up with a ten-day tour of Wales and a five-day tour of the Midlands.
    Who said they didn't exist?4,5,6
  • Newspaper Article*: In September 1970 the band Jynx was featured in a newspaper article in Transplant magazine: Jynx — welcomed by a squad of Roman soldiers!
    The uniform expression of the experienced pop musician in a strange town is a bored, disinterested look that comes from having lost long ago the naive enthusiasm to explore immediately every new place he comes to.
    Jynx are no exception — they're the type you recognise a mile off, without the at-home feel of the resident yet disdaining to look like tourists.
    And as with most creative musicians, the face is misleading. Eddie, Dave, Fred and Bob are an intelligent, wide-awake, aware foursome, friendly — and with a limitless fund of tales of group life.
    Like the time they played Aberdeen, and arrived in town to find the inhabitants roving about in every conceivable costume under the sun — “there were squads of Roman soldiers marching down the street!”
    It turned out they were booked to play a fancy-dress ball in an old church, which itself was done up in painted pews and a disco in the pulpit.
    Or the occasion when the long-haired group drove into a tiny town to be met by a main street full of fierce looking skinheads. They began to unload their gear at the club door and were immediately surrounded by a circle of bovver boys. The group got ready to fight their way out . . . and found the skinheads had only come to help them carry their heavy amps.
    Vocalist Fred recalls a date at a working men's club in the North of England. Worried about the older customers’ reaction to their music, Eddie informed the manager Jynx were a harmony soul group.
    After playing three soul numbers—all they knew—it got too much for them and they reverted to their usual heavy rock sound. The workers loved it, and demanded their return the next week.
    Just what is Jynx's music? Heavy, Deep Purple—Rare Bird—Atomic Rooster material mostly, with a number of originals by bassist Eddie Quinn.
    (The main influences on Eddie's song-writing are, according to drummer Bob Carson, the rest of the group. “In other words, if he writes something rotten, we do him!”)
    A move away from the usual group format is Jynx's line-up of organ, base, drums and vocal. Note the missing lead guitarist.
    "We've had two," explains Eddie, "but they didn't last long. Then we had the offer of another, but he didn't fit as a person.
    "And that's important. We've been together for three years now and we know each other. And once you're sound internally you're sound externally. Anyway, I can play lead if we need it."
    Fully professional, Jynx share the preference of many Scots groups for English audiences. They point out that in the South, you'll get encouragement as you play, even if you're having a bad night.
    In Scotland, they feel, you can do as well as anyone else, but all you'll hear is polite applause at the end. You only know if you've been liked if somebody comes up afterwards and tells you so.
    A definite pointer to the state of the Scottish scene is, in their opinion, the power of the promoters.
    In particular, those who run clubs and also manage groups—Jynx had one notable set-to once when they played a club, were liked, and were inundated with requests to return.
    To their disgust and that of the local music-lovers, the manager flatly refused to book them again, in spite of the demand. The future of his own groups came before pleasing the customers.
    As an East Coast group—from Dundee—Jynx find Glasgow especially hard to penetrate.
    But if they're unsuccessful in the "closed shop" of the big Western city, they've certainly made up for it elsewhere.
    Tours organised by their agents have taken the boys all over the English scene, an important market for any ambitious groups.
    As a result they've already had one offer of a recording break, which they turned down—because they didn't trust the man who made the offer!
    It's not many groups who'll turn down a recording offer, whatever the reason.
    That decision showed a feet-on-the-ground refusal to allow any stars in their eyes. But they needn't regret their decision too much.
    As they possess just as much talent as they do sense, it will be very surprising it we don't hear of more approaches to this group in the near future.
    All it needs is the right, honest offer, and who knows ... .7
    Transplant Magazine, Sept 1970
  • Newspaper Article: The band Jynx was mentioned in a newspaper article on 7 November 1970. The People's Journal: HAVE THE JYNX SHAKEN OFF THAT GREMLIN ?
    BEFORE the camera it was immediately made clear that the four lads who call themselves Jynx didn't favour the cheesy grin or the formal pose.
    “We don't,” said organ player Dave Paterson, “want to be taken for part of the teeny-bopper scene.”
    Which is as good a way as any of saying that Jynx, as professional entertainers, take themselves and their music seriously.
    Jynx consists of a quartet of Dundonians—Dave, from Downfield; Bob Carson, from Blackness Road; Fred Houston, Whitfield; and Eddie Quinn, Charleston.
    “But,” says Eddie, “we're probably better known in the North-East than in our native city.”
    Winners of a contest for groups in Fraserburgh this Summer which meant £100 as well as kudos, the boys ambitious. Ambitious enough to have taken the full-time professional step.
    On the last day of this month comes what they feel could be a big break for them—an appearance at Chester's Quaint Ways Club, jumping-off ground for such as the renowned Fleetwood Mac.
    * No copying
    For those who haven't heard them, Eddie describes Jynx’s style as akin to Deep Purple or Atomic Rooster. But Jynx want to be Jynx—not a copy of anybody.
    Eddie, self-taught, plays bass guitar and writes material for he group. Dave plays organ, Bob's the drummer and Fred the vocalist.
    They've been getting around. Their big van has taken them down south and recently they did 13 dates on a 10-day tour of Wales.
    “Tough? Yes, but great experience,” says Eddie. This progressive quartet also have hopes of a B.B.C. audition, and obviously won't be happy to let the grass grow under their feet.
    They hope the unhappy spell that gave them their name is long past.
    “It was a period when everything seemed to be going wrong,” recalls Eddie. “We were looking for a name at the time and one day, feeling exasperated after something else had gone awry, I said: ‘I don't know! There must be a jinx on this group!’ “
    So Jynx it was. With the difference in spelling adding a bit of theatrical flavour.
    Eddie, who lives at 15 Duncarse Place, hasn't regretted leaving the security of a Civil Service job for a less predictable career in music.
    “We're quite pleased with the way things are going so far,” he says.
    The Chester appearance could help confirm his and the other boys’ wisdom in taking the big step.
    Meantime the hard work of rehearsal on a quiet farm just outside town will go on. The boys don't bank on short-cuts to the top.8
  • Event-Misc*: Cutting from the Dundee Courier newspaper on Monday 19th July 1971 reads : Dundee pop festival attract 5000. Dundee's first pop festival came into being yesterday with the clashing of cymbals, the rolling of drums and the twang of guitars.
    Perhaps it wasn't quite on the scale of Woodstock or the Isle of Wight, but it still attracted thousands of the young and not so young to Camperdown Park yesterday.
    They sat in the brilliant sunshine while five hours of non-stop pop reverbrated from a tage at the south end of the park.
    There were close on 5000 teenagers around the stage by mid-afternoon.
    The concert was organised by 21-year-old Danny Blair, Salton Crescent, Whitfield.
    Five local groups, singers and a mobile disco performed during the afternoon.
    Dundee's entertainments officer Mr Colin Reed, speaking of its success, held out hopes for similar events.9
  • Note for Web*: In a climate of Ginger Baker, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, etc 'the JYNX' was born. The Jynx line-up was Bob on drums, Graeme 'Gus' Angus on lead guitar (for a time) followed by Dave Paterson on Hammond organ, Eddie Quinn on bass and Fred/Greig Houston leading at the front with vocals. Depending on their audience, Jynx performed an eclectic mix of music ranging from the emerging hard rock/heavy metal for the students at Aberdeen and Strathclyde University Unions and the US Navy at RAF Edzell to a much more ‘commercial’ mix including songs such as ‘Sixteen Tons’ and ‘Good Golly Miss Molly’ for the Working Men’s Clubs of North-East England. circa 1968.1
  • Note for Web: Sheet music of song "Sympathy" by Rare Bird - one of the numbers covered by Jynx in 1970.2

Citations

  1. [S6] PCC [Oct 2010].
  2. [S43] Held by PCC.
  3. [S32] Newspaper Article, Transplant Magazine, July 1970, issue Vol 1. No xx.
  4. [S43] Dundee Courier & Advertiser cutting in scrap book held by PCC.
  5. [S20] Unknown author, 'article', Dundee Courier & Advertiser, unknown date (DC Thomson, unknown repository reference) Dundee Evening Telegraph cutting in scrap book held by PCC.
  6. [S43] Transplant Magazine cutting in scrap book held by PCC.
  7. [S32] Transplant Magazine, September 1970, issue Vol 1. No 10.
  8. [S43] The People's Journal cutting in scrapbook held by PCC.
  9. [S20] Unknown author, 'article', Held at DCC Central Library in cuttings books [July 2011].