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Springing from the hand loom weavers of linen in the burgh of Forfar, today's people are engaged in many of the traditional professions - medicine, law, accountancy, teaching, architecture, engineering - and some of the more recent disciplines in field of IT in the form of programmers, web designers and software engineers. And whilst many of us remain in the UK - particularly in Scotland, especially in the Forfar and Dundee area, we have also emigrated to the traditional commonwealth countries - South Africa, Canada, Austrailia - and the US.

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James Kinnear Adamson 1878 - 1956
  • James Kinnear Adamson, teacher Born in Forfar, the son of a tailor, James was fatherless before he was 3. His mother brought him and his brother to Dundee where she worked in the mills to ensure her boys were housed and fed. He was one of Dundee's best known commercial teachers working at Stobswell and head of commercial subjects at Logie. He taught shorthand to thousands of Dundee pupils, by whom he was held in high esteem. He retired in 1948 and continued part-time tuition work. In his youth, he was a certificate winner for 180 words per minute at 16 and was teaching shorthand a year later. In all, his career as a teacher lasted 60 years. Mr Adamson was a former secretary, treasurer and president if the EIS, commercial section, St Andrews district, and a life member of the EIS. He was an elder and former treasurer of Park Church and an ex-president of Maryfield Bowling Club.

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David Kinnear Adamson 1877 - 1948
  • David Kinnear Adamson, mason, printer, civil servant Born in Forfar, the son of a tailor, David was fatherless before he was 4. His mother brought him and his brother to Dundee where she worked in the mills to ensure her boys were housed and fed. He was good with his hands and one of the first memories his grandson has of him is a wooden wheelbarrow that he made for him. He had a beautiful tenor singing voice and entertained the ward when he was recovering from wounds sustained duing the first world war.

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Douglas George Adamson, 1915-1979
  • Douglas George Adamson, MBChB, MD, FRCP, physician Excelling in everything he turned his hand to, Douglas was an outstanding physician and, in his early years, sportsman. During WW2, he had a most distinguished career, serving in Egypt, Syria, Persia, Iraq and ultimately with the 14th (or 'Forgotton') Army in Burma. His many and varied interests outside of medicine included photography, ornithology, angling, hillwalking, horticulture, music and golf.

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James Kinnear Adamson MA
  • James Kinnear Adamson MA A hockey player in his youth, turning out for the Scottish Midlands, James was the first in his family to go to university, gaining an MA at St Andrews in 1932. He served through the 2nd World War years with the Royal Army Service Corps and ended up in Berlin as the war ended. It was here that he met his brother Douglas, who had been in Burma in the latter part of the war.

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Honour a Physician, Philip Auld
  • George David Walker Adamson MBE; aka Philip Auld, doctor and author His WW2 service earned George the MBE and once home, he practiced as a GP for the rest of his professional life. For relaxation, George wrote novels which featured - and commentated upon - the working practices of those employed in the fledgling NHS of the 1940s and 50s.

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John Moffat Adamson, mining engineer in South Africa